Venture capital – MS Coursing http://mscoursing.com/ Sun, 10 Oct 2021 10:59:53 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://mscoursing.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-150x150.png Venture capital – MS Coursing http://mscoursing.com/ 32 32 Countdown to our rapture with AI – TechCrunch https://mscoursing.com/countdown-to-our-rapture-with-ai-techcrunch/ https://mscoursing.com/countdown-to-our-rapture-with-ai-techcrunch/#respond Sat, 09 Oct 2021 17:05:05 +0000 https://mscoursing.com/countdown-to-our-rapture-with-ai-techcrunch/ Welcome to The TechCrunch Exchange, a weekly startup and market newsletter. It is inspired by what day of the week Exchange column digs, but free, and made for your weekend reading. Want it in your inbox every Saturday? Register now here. Happy Saturday everyone. Hope you are well, rested and relaxed. Today we are going […]]]>

Welcome to The TechCrunch Exchange, a weekly startup and market newsletter. It is inspired by what day of the week Exchange column digs, but free, and made for your weekend reading. Want it in your inbox every Saturday? Register now here.

Happy Saturday everyone. Hope you are well, rested and relaxed.

Today we are going to have fun. Of course, at the bottom we have our usual mix of rounds and venture capital ratings and so on. But first, let’s talk about AI.

This week, I got to chat with two different companies who are working to make artificial intelligence a little more concrete. One was for hardware, the other for software.

On the material side, I spoke with Peter Chapman of IonQ. IonQ is a quantum computing company that recently became public via a SPAC. However, instead of digging into buyouts and other blank check minutiae, Chapman and I mainly discussed science fiction and what strong AI really means.

Simply put, strong AI is not the way Alexa works today. Alexa, according to Chapman, works by asking engineers to code many possible responses to queries. It evolves for a while. Corn strong AI needs to be able to write its own code, Chapman explained, which makes it fundamentally different from human-generated question-and-answer setups.

This fits the quantum topic because quantum computing, Chapman said, is very good for the kind of code generation that a strong AI will require. And, most importantly, it’s also good enough to analyze a myriad of probabilities at the same time and choose between them.

All this to say that quantum computing is reaching its early commercial stages and that companies like IonQ – named for its use of trapped ions in its technology – are helping usher in this new era of computing. As quantum computing becomes more and more mainstream, we should be able to get closer to the kind of AI that is not limited to ML models at a macro scale.

On the software side, I had a phone with Rachel Carpenter, CEO of Intrinio. Her business has built a huge set of financial data which it makes available through an API. As a financial nerd, that’s cool. The amount of time you spend reading the documents filed with the SEC will determine whether or not you care about this part of Intrinio.

But the startup is also building something called Théa, an AI service that works by weaving neural networks into a personalized natural language processing machine capable of understanding text. For people looking to analyze huge amounts of financial reports, this is a great product idea.

What struck me when talking to Carpenter was that Thea was first trained on the larger Internet. It’s not just a financial language analysis tool. He can do more.

Today, the company keeps Thea’s focus on its financial niche, according to the CEO. But if Intrinio can launch something this complex using partially open source services, we could see many more smart systems like Thea hit the market in the years to come. Merge that with increasingly commercial quantum computing technology and it seems, maybe, that we may one day be on our way, perhaps, to getting closer to real artificial intelligence.

Yes, we were both born 50 years too early.

Venture capital this, venture capital which

As expected, the venture capital landscape in the third quarter was completely bonkers. Crazy dish. Historically rich. Choose your phrasing.

So far, Q4 is exactly and exactly the same. A sample :

  • Notion raised a $ 275 million round for a valuation of $ 10 billion, according to Alex Konrad at Forbes. (Alexis has done a great job lately, I must note.) This is indeed free capital. How? ‘Or’ What? Notion has just sold 2.75% of itself for north of a quarter of a billion dollars. In terms of capital efficiency in terms of dilution, it’s… cheap. Especially for a startup that is still too concerned about its income scale to really share the numbers. Notion still had a bunch of his last round in the bank before this round. Thus, he raised a quarter of a billion dollars on specifications, from investors who had so much capital to bet that the company manages an exit of at least 30 billion dollars in time. Let’s see.
  • And this week Modern treasure raised an $ 85 million Series C which values ​​the fintech company “payment transactions” at more than $ 2 billion. The company upped its Series B earlier this year when it was valued at around $ 300 million by PitchBook data. It’s a lot of value creation in a very, very short time period ! But it seems pretty fitting for what we’ve seen in recent months.

All that to say that it doesn’t look like the fourth quarter is slowing down compared to the second and third quarters of this year. If 2022 doesn’t surpass the 2021 venture capital totals, I wonder how long it will take before I revisit this type of investment.

What a time to live.

In other news, I’ve written some other take-out tips this week – here and here – if you want something with more bite.

Alexis



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Questions Raised about Natural Gas Source for Elon Musk’s Texas Spaceport – TechCrunch https://mscoursing.com/questions-raised-about-natural-gas-source-for-elon-musks-texas-spaceport-techcrunch/ https://mscoursing.com/questions-raised-about-natural-gas-source-for-elon-musks-texas-spaceport-techcrunch/#respond Fri, 08 Oct 2021 22:11:01 +0000 https://mscoursing.com/questions-raised-about-natural-gas-source-for-elon-musks-texas-spaceport-techcrunch/ For a rundown of TechCrunch’s most important and important stories delivered to your inbox every day at 3:00 p.m. PDT, subscribe here. Hello and welcome to the Daily Crunch on October 8, 2021! It’s Friday! We did it! If you’re tired, consider how tired the Instagram team has to be. Their service has even more […]]]>

For a rundown of TechCrunch’s most important and important stories delivered to your inbox every day at 3:00 p.m. PDT, subscribe here.

Hello and welcome to the Daily Crunch on October 8, 2021! It’s Friday! We did it! If you’re tired, consider how tired the Instagram team has to be. Their service has even more uptime issues this afternoon. Between that and the news that its users are no longer allowed to sell pieces of the Amazon rainforest, it’s a record week for Zuck’s empire. Now let’s talk about technology! – Alexis

The Top 3 TechCrunch

  • Elon’s mystery gas: SpaceX’s big plans for its biggest rockets lack some details on where the company intends to find the tens of millions of cubic feet of natural gas it will need. Of course, Tesla is gas-free, but SpaceX left some question marks in a Programmatic Environmental Assessment (PEA) project regarding combustible gas that makes us scratch our heads.
  • European startups should receive a pre-seed boost: The early stage founders in Europe are about to have a few new accelerators in their neighborhood, thanks to Techstars. The accelerator collective is opening programs in Paris (again) and Stockholm, in addition to its current efforts on the continent. According to the CEO of Techstars, there are far more founders in Europe today than are served, despite record venture capital totals.
  • Tesla moves its headquarters to Texas: Ah, the taxes. Tesla will be moving its Austin, Texas headquarters from its traditional California home, but it will not stop investing in the West Coast state. Indeed, the company intends to increase “the production of its Fremont gigafactory by 50%”, reports TechCrunch. So, Texas taxes. This is what this movement seems to be.

Startups / VC

  • TechCrunch Annie njanja reports that “economic growth and the rapid expansion of digital and mobile services” in markets like Kenya and Africa as a whole could lead to an insurtech product boom. Insurtech has proven to be fertile ground for founders and investors in North America and Europe. So why not Africa too? African startups have proven to be strong in the fintech market, so maybe the push to insurtech is overdue.
  • Today’s Tiger round is actually the news of an impending round. Namely that the investor impresario can put capital to work in Slice. Slice is an Indian company looking to strengthen the use of credit cards in the country. Tiger could invest $ 100 million in the company, according to TechCrunch reports. Manish Singh writes for the blog that Slice “raised around $ 30 million in previous rounds and was valued under $ 200 million in one round earlier this year.” More soon, I think. (Note: Slice, the American pizza software service, is not the same as Slice above. Also note that startups should come up with more distinct names!)
  • Next step: Alpha Paw, who just raised $ 8 million. If you’re willing to poke fun at a pet welfare startup for venture capital fundraising, I can say you haven’t been to the vet lately. If you are successful in keeping your pets healthy, you may be able to save a lot of money. Alpha Paw “offers pet products for dogs and cats, such as foods and supplements tailored to the breed of pets,” to be precise. Considering that about half of my generation has more dogs than children (the current score is 3-0 in my house), I would expect Alpha Paw to raise over $ 800 million. ‘by December.
  • Closing our startup cover today, Productfy has raised $ 16 million for its Bank as a Service (BaaS) product. I have to admit I lost track of all the different BaaS (pronounced like fish, if you’re wondering) startups out there. They all seem capable of raising capital, so there has to be growth to share. But in the long term, will we see a consolidation of the BaaS? We’re finally seeing a little movement in the hot OKR boot space, and BaaS feels even more crowded. For now, however, Productfy “aims to set itself apart with its mission of building DeFi for traditional finance, according to founder and CEO Duy Vo,” according to our own. Marie-Anne Azevedo.

Private Equity Ready to Take MSP Consolidation to the Next Level

The good news: Businesses of all stripes are digitizing their operations faster than ever, creating huge benefits for companies starting work now.

The bad news is that many technicians are already looking for new jobs, and companies must compete to find the right people who can create robust and secure IT environments.

Managed Service Providers (MSPs) are filling the void and private equity firms are paying attention.

“MSPs have all the ingredients private equity loves,” write Mike McGill and Kevin Jolley of Cowen and Company, LLC.

“Strong demand trend, low risk of obsolescence, ‘sticky’ service that attracts long-term customers and high recurring revenues, high cash margins and relatively ‘asset-light’ activity.”

(TechCrunch + is our membership program, which helps startup founders and teams get ahead. You can register here.)

Big Tech Inc.

TechCrunch Experts

Creative knowledge illustration

Image credits: SEAN GLADWELL / Getty Images

If you have a software consultant that you think other startup founders should know about, fill out the survey here.

Read one of the testimonials we received below!

Consultant: ManagedKube

Recommended by: Garland Kan, consultant

Testimony: “[They have] a deep understanding of cloud technology and how to use it in combination with open source software to provide us with a scalable yet easy to understand and maintain infrastructure. They were literally trying to make themselves obsolete!

We continue to add content to our growing marketing vertical. Check out this article on TechCrunch + by Jonathan Martinez: “5 Common Growth Marketing Mistakes By Startups. If there’s a growth marketer you think we should know about, Let us know.



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Mexico finally knows a boon for startups https://mscoursing.com/mexico-finally-knows-a-boon-for-startups/ https://mscoursing.com/mexico-finally-knows-a-boon-for-startups/#respond Thu, 07 Oct 2021 15:11:12 +0000 https://mscoursing.com/mexico-finally-knows-a-boon-for-startups/ October 9, 2021 KAVAK, A MEXICAN startup, provides an elegant solution to a glaring problem: how to buy a used vehicle in a market that is both one of the largest and most informal in the world. Few buyers trust a seller’s assessment of the quality of the property. Few sellers trust the buyer to […]]]>

KAVAK, A MEXICAN startup, provides an elegant solution to a glaring problem: how to buy a used vehicle in a market that is both one of the largest and most informal in the world. Few buyers trust a seller’s assessment of the quality of the property. Few sellers trust the buyer to shell out the money. Transactions often involve “meeting someone at a convenience store and seeing how it goes,” says Alejandro Guerra, general manager of Kavak in Mexico. On the Kavak app, people can buy and sell cars with the company acting as a trusted intermediary.

Kavak, which last month raised $ 700 million in a funding round valued at $ 8.7 billion, is part of a startup explosion in Mexico. Since the company became the first Mexican startup to be valued at over $ 1 billion last year, it has been joined by three other “unicorns.” So far this year, unlisted Mexican tech companies have raised nearly $ 3 billion, about as much as in the previous nine years combined (see chart).

Mexico’s 126 million people are on average young and fall almost in the upper middle income bracket. Some 54% own a smartphone, according to Newzoo, a research company, a slightly higher share than among Brazilians who are equally enamored of new things. Mexico is among the top five markets for tech stars like Uber in carpooling or Spotify in music streaming. That’s a huge deal for Rappi, a Colombian food delivery darling. Until recently, however, national founders struggled to make a name for themselves.

This is largely because of a lack of money. Mexican entrepreneurs had to go to local venture capital firms with relatively shallow pockets. That started to change in 2019, when SoftBank launched a LatinAmerica fund. In September, Japan’s free-spending tech investment group announced a second $ 3 billion fund, bringing its total investment in the region to $ 8 billion, much of it in Mexico. Others have piled up, including Sea, a Singaporean tech conglomerate, Founders Fund, a major Silicon Valley venture capitalist (CV) and Tiger Global, an aggressive New York hedge fund that recently rocked the CV world.

That money has poured into local businesses like Kavak solving what Philipp Haugwitz of McKinsey, a consultancy firm, calls “pain points” in Mexico, which are numerous, from horrific traffic to a heavy financial sector. With just one in three Mexicans having a bank account, hard-to-get loans, and too many cash-only businesses, fintech startups in particular are thriving, in part thanks to a 2018 fintech law. Fintech Radar, an industry newsletter, Mexico now has more fintechs than Brazil, the company’s historic hub in Latin America. Albo, an exclusively digital “neobank”, facilitates the creation of an account. Clip offers bank card readers for smartphones. GBM grants loans to small businesses with no credit history. Kavak helps finance transactions on its platform.

Obstacles remain. Like many startups, Mexican women face a hazy road to profitability. Dealing with bureaucracy is a nightmare; it can take days for Kavak to process a transaction in Mexico, compared to less than 40 minutes in Brazil. Still, investors are optimistic. Marcelo Claure, who heads the Latin American fund SoftBank, calls Mexico “the land of opportunity.” This has helped his fund’s returns surpass those of all other regions, he says. And what works in Mexico may work in other emerging markets. Kavak, which expanded to Argentina last year and Brazil this year, is now looking at those across the Pacific and Atlantic.

For a deeper analysis of the biggest stories in economics, business and markets, sign up for Money Talks, our weekly newsletter.

This article appeared in the Business section of the print edition under the headline “The Mexican Wave”


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B2B companies, a key element of the payments market in Latin America to attract investors https://mscoursing.com/b2b-companies-a-key-element-of-the-payments-market-in-latin-america-to-attract-investors/ https://mscoursing.com/b2b-companies-a-key-element-of-the-payments-market-in-latin-america-to-attract-investors/#respond Thu, 07 Oct 2021 06:15:00 +0000 https://mscoursing.com/b2b-companies-a-key-element-of-the-payments-market-in-latin-america-to-attract-investors/ You are reading Entrepreneur United States, an international Entrepreneur Media franchise. Depositphotos.com After a year in which the digitization of processes was essential to support the collection and payment market in Latin America, finally, financial inclusion is starting to be an opportunity to boost the economy of the real protagonists of the creation of value […]]]>

You are reading Entrepreneur United States, an international Entrepreneur Media franchise.

Depositphotos.com

After a year in which the digitization of processes was essential to support the collection and payment market in Latin America, finally, financial inclusion is starting to be an opportunity to boost the economy of the real protagonists of the creation of value and opportunity: SMEs. According to Innovation People’s 2021 Business Digitization Study, 83% of small and medium-sized businesses say they have stepped up and invested a large portion of their budget in implementing new digital strategies.

The large venture capital funds (Venture Capital) are attentive to this opportunity represented by the SME segment and the offer books (book / buy / sell book) begin to realize this; In this sense, the startups able to offer solutions according to the profile of the user and which solve both fees and payments will undoubtedly be the ones who get the best tokens.

In a context where large funds are disbursing two- and three-digit rounds, and sometimes even much more, eager to promote development and user acquisition, the segment that attracts the most attention is that of payments in the B2B vertical between small and medium-sized companies.

If we take as a benchmark the fintech category – parent category of the payments segment – recorded a further increase in the first half of 2021, according to the KPMG report “Pulse of Fintech” , on investment trends in the sector. Funding for this segment increased from $ 87.1 billion in the second half of 2020 to $ 98 billion in the first half of 2021.

In 2020, the list of Latin American unicorns was 22, while to date there are already 24. That is, 2 new unicorns in the region were born in one semester. And it is no coincidence that among all the local unicorns, one of them, Nubank, a fintech, occupies the eleventh position among those with the highest valuation in the world, according to the measurement of CB Insights.

The ten best unicorns in the region are:

  • Nubank, Brazil, $ 30 billion.
  • C6 Bank, Brazil, $ 5.9 billion.
  • Kavak, Mexico, $ 4 billion.
  • QuintoAndar, Brazil, $ 4 billion.
  • Rappi, Colombia, $ 3.5 billion.
  • WildLife Studios, Brazil, $ 3 billion.
  • Loft, Brazil, $ 2.9 billion.
  • Creditas, Brazil, $ 1.75 billion.
  • LifeMiles, Colombia, $ 1.5 billion.
  • iFood, Brazil, $ 1,000 billion.

The B2B opportunity in the SME market

Under pressure to accelerate digital transformation and improve the necessary technological tools, various companies have become fully involved in venture capital operations and have invested around $ 21 billion in nearly 600 operations around the world, according to the KPMG report. . In this way, many companies have realized that it is faster to achieve this by partnering, investing in or acquiring fintech companies.

B2B startups have paved the way for fintech startups. Latin America is experiencing a perfect storm that positions it as a market to watch closely for years to come. The tech sector will be the engine of economic growth in the region, with fintech at the forefront.

In the United States, traditional service companies accounted for 90% of the most profitable domestic companies. Only 10% were technological. Today, more than 50% of the best-valued companies are digital-based, or 6 out of 10. And it could be the same in Latam.

At the same time, a study carried out by Finnovista indicates that today 210 insurtech (insurance fintech), 491 lendingtech (loan fintech), 601 paytech (payment fintech) and 222 richtech (investment fintech) operate in Latin America. . This means that the lead is on fintech payments (39% of the total institutions that offer FinTech services in the region).

For these reasons, platforms that integrate simultaneous payment and collection solutions oriented towards the B2B market are currently the vertical with the greatest capacity for impact on the regional economy.

The increasingly close relationship between PME and VC

Latin American SMEs generate around two-thirds of jobs, a quarter of GDP and, in number, represent over 99% of all existing businesses. Only these data are sufficient to measure its importance.

“Entrepreneurs have accelerated the reconfiguration of the economic model of large and small companies, they have renewed themselves and are looking for investment alternatives. It has become the main catalyst for digital transformation, which has impacted revenues and caught the attention of venture capitalists (Venture Capital), ”adds Schorr, CEO of Flexio.

According to LAVCA (Association for Private Capital Investment in Latin America), e-commerce, fintech, logistics, healthcare and biotechnology, prop tech, marketplace, smart cities and mobility are the sectors that are driving the greater profit from venture capital.

According to this same association, despite the difficulties introduced by the pandemic, private capital fundraising in the region increased by 30% in 2020, compared to 2019. As for Mexico, it now represents a capital opportunity. risk of 2.4 billion per year. in the average emerging market, 3.3 times more than in 2019.

For its part, the report by the research area of ​​Mexican venture capital fund Antoni Lelo de Larrea Venture Partners (ALLVP), one of the most active venture capital firms, indicates that during the second quarter 2020 a total of 133 investments in startups in Latin America. The greatest number of investments took place in seed capital towers.

Coming back to the Mexican case, there are currently in the country at least 126 venture capital investment funds recognized by the Mexican Association of Private Capital (Amexcap). So it looks like 2021 is the time to invest in Latin American companies, in general, and Mexican companies in particular.


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The South East now has more than 300 venture capital firms https://mscoursing.com/the-south-east-now-has-more-than-300-venture-capital-firms/ https://mscoursing.com/the-south-east-now-has-more-than-300-venture-capital-firms/#respond Wed, 06 Oct 2021 09:04:46 +0000 https://mscoursing.com/the-south-east-now-has-more-than-300-venture-capital-firms/ The Southeast region is now home to more than 300 individual venture capital firms, according to data collected by Embarc collective and Build in SE‘s Southeast Capital Landscape Report, a directory of active investors in the region. That number – 309 at the time of this publication – is up more than 30% in the […]]]>

The Southeast region is now home to more than 300 individual venture capital firms, according to data collected by Embarc collective and Build in SE‘s Southeast Capital Landscape Report, a directory of active investors in the region.

That number – 309 at the time of this publication – is up more than 30% in the past three years. This density centers around Georgia, Florida, and Tennessee, as Atlanta has 59 companies in the database, followed by Miami (40), Nashville (34), and Tampa (24).

While 123 companies are independent of the industry in terms of investment criteria, 85 invest specifically in healthcare and 110 focus on business or software startups.

Data captured in the report also suggests that over 40% of start-up VCs in Atlanta alone have a diverse management team or focus on investing in diverse founders, suggesting that access to capital is becoming more accessible. to founders who are generally under-represented.

Allie Felix, vice president of Platform at Embarc Collective, told Hypepotamus that this growth comes from a mix of local transplants and talent investing in the ecosystem.

Felix, herself from the Southeast who returned home after spending time in The Bay and New York, believes the ‘flywheel’ effect is starting to take hold in the region with the arrival of new talents and new investors in the region.

As ‘work from anywhere’ models have become the norm during the pandemic, companies across the country have moved southeast or opened additional offices in the region to capture the awe-inspiring. transaction flow from the region in recent years.

Bigger names in venture capital like Softbank, Founders Fund, Harlem Capital and General Catalyst have all opened offices in the region. These companies are already causing a sensation in the region; Softbank launched a A $ 100 million initiative invest in local Miami startups and General Catalyst has entered the Southeast market to seek to invest in CivicTech startups.

New direction, new growth

It’s no surprise that the Southeast has prompted out-of-town investors to relocate. But as the ecosystem of FinTech, MedTech, and B2B SaaS startups continues to grow in the region, it has helped the region retain graduates from top engineering schools like Georgia Tech, Duke, Virginia Tech, University of Miami. and the state of North Carolina.

This talent pool has ushered in a more diverse pool of founders, many of whom have entered the local venture capital world and are focused on investing in the local startup scene.

Companies that have closed their tours in recent years, such as Highlight, The world in business, Capital of collaboration, and The JumpFund – focus on a hyperlocal or hyperfocused investment thesis.

Founders are encouraged to view the list of potential investors in the region, and investors who are not yet listed are encouraged to add their business to the database. here.

Get news like this delivered straight to your inbox by signing up for the Hypepotamus newsletter!

photo by Jesse adair to Unsplash


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Improving startup results through female leadership – TechCrunch https://mscoursing.com/improving-startup-results-through-female-leadership-techcrunch/ https://mscoursing.com/improving-startup-results-through-female-leadership-techcrunch/#respond Tue, 05 Oct 2021 21:56:36 +0000 https://mscoursing.com/improving-startup-results-through-female-leadership-techcrunch/ Leah Edwards is a passionate fan and connector in technology and impact, a speaker at UC Berkeley and Stanford and a partner at Pegasus Technology Companies, a Silicon Valley-based venture capital firm. Over the course of my career – spanning entrepreneurship, academia, arts management and venture capital – I have learned the importance of female […]]]>

Over the course of my career – spanning entrepreneurship, academia, arts management and venture capital – I have learned the importance of female leadership in contributing to good results.

A variety of perspectives, including those of women leaders, enhance problem solving and decision making. I believe new perspectives generate ‘additive’ moments: instances where one member of a team further enhances another member’s idea. Teams made up of like-minded people with similar backgrounds are limited in the scope of their perspectives and, as a result, they limit the potential of their businesses.

So the question is, are you recruiting and organizing to access the widest range of ideas and perspectives?

As a partner of Pegasus Technology Companies, I realize that the venture capital industry prides itself on finding teams with distant ideas that change the industry. However, the truth is that the industry has a low percentage of female leaders compared to other industries.

Not only are there few female partners in venture capital funds, but we are also not doing enough to support female founders. Startups received an unprecedented financial investment during the pandemic, but founders have lost ground.

Research has proven time and time again that diversity is good for business. Public companies with at least one woman on the board tend to outperform those with only men. Various teams were also found to produce the most creative ideas.

A key element of the Design Thinking and Lean Startup methods – which have served entrepreneurial ecosystems well – is to lead by doing. Let’s take specific steps that will translate into more female leadership in the startup world.

Here is what I do; Hope this inspires you to take your own action.

Hire to improve results

I think startups (and venture capitalists) need to change their recruiting practices to diversify their teams. While it’s easier to leverage the founders’ existing networks to recruit, it’s worth expanding your reach.

One technique I have used is to partner with leading universities around the world that are committed to recruiting diverse student bodies. It helps me tap into a larger pool of diverse talent, including female leaders. These new recruits have more varied backgrounds and life experiences, so they bring new perspectives.

It is also helpful for startup executives to organize open office hours during which potential candidates can ask questions about company culture, open positions, and how to apply for them. Personally, I have succeeded in attracting a more diverse pool of applicants when I made it a comfortable and welcoming process. Make sure candidates understand your business goals and your belief that diverse perspectives directly contribute to the creativity and productivity of your teams.

Here’s a great case study: Orchestras found they naturally achieved greater gender diversity when auditioning new members with review boards that didn’t know the names of the candidates and couldn’t see them. By focusing only on what matters – their musical talent – they were able to overcome unconscious prejudices.

How can we do this in startups? Some companies hide candidates ‘names when reviewing resumes, and some offer tests or other assignments where candidates’ aptitudes for specific types of work can be assessed, regardless of gender or background.

Invest in diversity

On the venture capital investment side, the parallel with hiring is selecting the type of management teams you want to invest in. By looking for entrepreneurial teams with female managers and employees, you are likely to find more creative and resilient startups.

It’s best to challenge and improve products during the development process, not after launch. A diverse team gives you a better opportunity to see your target market accurately and understand the customer’s perspective. As an investor, you will get exactly what every investor wants by supporting more diverse teams: greater financial reward for a given level of risk.

A healthy and diverse team will challenge old ideas and generate a greater variety of innovative solutions. If you invest in consumer-oriented businesses, you can’t afford to exclude women from leadership positions. Since women control the majority of spending decisions and an increasing amount of wealth, you will improve your chances of success by investing in teams that include women decision makers.

We should also look at ourselves in the mirror. These principles would benefit the operations of venture capital firms, not just our portfolio companies. Equipping your venture capital firm with diverse talent helps you broaden your perspective on where the next big idea came from. By diversifying investment teams, we will counter unconscious biases and recognize great ideas, no matter where they come from.

At Pegasus Tech Ventures, we strive to hire diverse employees. About 40% of Pegasus decision makers are women.

I don’t think we should be promoting greater participation of women in startups and venture capital just because it’s right. Smart startup founders and investors should pursue their enlightened self-interest: Recruit and invest in female employees and leaders to improve your bottom line.

In doing so, you will establish and support startups designed for long-term success. Better ideas, more innovation, higher income and long-term profitability will be your reward.


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Private equity and venture capital firms inject $ 415 million into Tamil Nadu-based companies https://mscoursing.com/private-equity-and-venture-capital-firms-inject-415-million-into-tamil-nadu-based-companies/ https://mscoursing.com/private-equity-and-venture-capital-firms-inject-415-million-into-tamil-nadu-based-companies/#respond Mon, 04 Oct 2021 20:16:36 +0000 https://mscoursing.com/private-equity-and-venture-capital-firms-inject-415-million-into-tamil-nadu-based-companies/ Private Equity and Venture Capital (PE-VC) firms invested $ 415 million in 18 deals at Tamil Nadu-based companies during the third quarter of this year, data from Venture Intelligence, a service showing. of research. The main investments in PE-VC for the quarter, which ended on September 30, went to TVS Supply Chain Solutions ($ 136 […]]]>

Private Equity and Venture Capital (PE-VC) firms invested $ 415 million in 18 deals at Tamil Nadu-based companies during the third quarter of this year, data from Venture Intelligence, a service showing. of research.

The main investments in PE-VC for the quarter, which ended on September 30, went to TVS Supply Chain Solutions ($ 136 million) followed by CredAvenue, the subsidiary of Vivriti Capital, which connects institutions, investors, small businesses and individuals, who do not have access to financial services in India ($ 90 million). Ki Mobility Solution has raised $ 51 million from a fund managed by Exor, one of Europe’s leading holding companies.

In terms of angel investments, during the third quarter of 2021, around ten state-owned startups received funding. Last year, during the same period, seven startups received angel funding. Fieldproxy, IppoPay, Chai Waale, and NimbleBox.ai are some of the companies that have received angel funding in recent months.

Initial public offerings

“While it is encouraging to see the record pace of PE-VC investment in India continuing, the highlight of the last quarter was the success of the Indian market’s initial public offering (IPO) focused on the consumer market. Zomato and Global Enterprise Software as a Service (SaaS) focused on Freshworks, ”said Arun Natarajan, Founder of Venture Intelligence.

“Such exemplary liquidity events will increase the share of the asset allocation pie that PE-VC investing in India commands from domestic and foreign investors,” he added. During the same period in 2020, when businesses were slowly opening after the first lockdown was lifted, investors in PE-VC had invested $ 107 million in seven deals in TN businesses.

Nationally, PE-VC firms have invested a record $ 49 billion in 840 transactions in Indian companies in the first 9 months of 2021. These figures, which have already exceeded total annual investment by 39 , $ 5 billion (out of 892 transactions) in the whole of 2020, is a 52% increase from the $ 32.2 billion (out of 651 transactions) in the first nine months of 2020.


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Why and when startups should look to various sources of capital – TechCrunch https://mscoursing.com/why-and-when-startups-should-look-to-various-sources-of-capital-techcrunch/ https://mscoursing.com/why-and-when-startups-should-look-to-various-sources-of-capital-techcrunch/#respond Sun, 03 Oct 2021 14:48:34 +0000 https://mscoursing.com/why-and-when-startups-should-look-to-various-sources-of-capital-techcrunch/ Venture capital is a source of capital for start-ups, but it is certainly not the only one. Debt is an increasingly popular alternative, as is income-based non-dilutive financing. We therefore invited Accel Partner Matthieu arun, co-founder and president of Clearco Michele Romanow, and co-founder and co-CEO of Pipe Harry hurst at TechCrunch Disrupt 2021 last […]]]>

Venture capital is a source of capital for start-ups, but it is certainly not the only one. Debt is an increasingly popular alternative, as is income-based non-dilutive financing.

We therefore invited Accel Partner Matthieu arun, co-founder and president of Clearco Michele Romanow, and co-founder and co-CEO of Pipe Harry hurst at TechCrunch Disrupt 2021 last week to discuss the different ways companies can raise capital and who might be the best avenue for startups. (Hurst unfortunately had a power failure and was therefore not available for the entire panel).

Clearco and Pipe both offer revenue-based financing and both have raised significant amounts of venture capital themselves, some would argue ironically. But Romanow and Hurst were adamant in their belief that venture capital funding and other forms of capital need not be “mutually exclusive.”

“I actually think the larger companies in our portfolio typically use several different pools of capital,” Romanow said. “I encourage you to do your research on what type of capital is good for what particular stage of the business you are in, and what particular purpose you are using it for. And if you do that, I think you’ll find that you’ll end up being a lot less watered down at the end of the day. And you will actually find more leverage over time, which will allow you to scale much faster.

Mathew argued that the majority of startups are in fact not an excellent choice for venture capital investment. “Venture capital investment is expensive and depending on who you are raising comes with certain expectations, ”he said.

Romanow pointed out that a founder’s decision whether or not to go into venture capital or other types of financing depends largely on the intended use of the money. For example, if a startup was looking for capital to spend on inventory and advertising, then venture capital dollars wouldn’t be the best solution. “It really doesn’t make sense to give up valuable equity at an early stage to do something that’s a repeatable, scalable expense with a fixed return,” Romanow said.


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Jeff Bezos invests in Indonesian e-commerce Ula – TechCrunch https://mscoursing.com/jeff-bezos-invests-in-indonesian-e-commerce-ula-techcrunch/ https://mscoursing.com/jeff-bezos-invests-in-indonesian-e-commerce-ula-techcrunch/#respond Sun, 03 Oct 2021 07:07:30 +0000 https://mscoursing.com/jeff-bezos-invests-in-indonesian-e-commerce-ula-techcrunch/ Indonesian e-commerce startup Ula, which has raised more than $ 30 million and wooed many top investors since launching last year, has now won the trust of the richest person in the world. The founder of Amazon has invested in the new funding round of the one-and-a-half-year startup, sources and others familiar with the matter […]]]>

Indonesian e-commerce startup Ula, which has raised more than $ 30 million and wooed many top investors since launching last year, has now won the trust of the richest person in the world.

The founder of Amazon has invested in the new funding round of the one-and-a-half-year startup, sources and others familiar with the matter told me.

The Jakarta-based company – which counts B Capital Group, Sequoia Capital India, Lightspeed Venture Partners and Quona Capital among its existing investors – is at an advanced stage in talks to finalize a new funding round of more than $ 80 million.

Jeff Bezos has agreed to invest in Ula through his family office, Bezos Expeditions, people said, asking for anonymity as the matter is private. B Capital Group, Tencent and Prosus Ventures are positioning themselves to co-lead the cycle, which could end as early as this month.

Bezos’ interest in Ula, which operates a business-to-business e-commerce platform, comes at a time when Amazon has not entered most countries in Southeast Asia – or maintains a limited presence there.

Ula’s public relations representatives did not respond to requests for comment on Saturday.

Ula helps small retailers solve inefficiencies they face in supply chain, inventory and working capital. It operates an e-commerce wholesale marketplace to help store owners stock only the inventory they need and also gives them working capital.

The startup was founded by Nipun Mehra (former executive of Flipkart in India and former partner of Sequoia Capital India), Alan Wong (who previously worked with Amazon), Derry Sakti (who oversaw the operations of consumer goods giant P&G in Indonesia), and Riky Tenggara (formerly at Lazada and aCommerce).


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The full-stack approach, but this time with no status quo – TechCrunch https://mscoursing.com/the-full-stack-approach-but-this-time-with-no-status-quo-techcrunch/ https://mscoursing.com/the-full-stack-approach-but-this-time-with-no-status-quo-techcrunch/#respond Sat, 02 Oct 2021 18:05:56 +0000 https://mscoursing.com/the-full-stack-approach-but-this-time-with-no-status-quo-techcrunch/ Welcome to startups Weekly, a new human look at the news and trends of this week’s startups. To receive it in your inbox, subscribe here. Founders and emerging tech investors need to exude extreme energy from the main character, as this Week in Tech was all about making their lives easier. AngelList announced AngelList Stack, […]]]>

Welcome to startups Weekly, a new human look at the news and trends of this week’s startups. To receive it in your inbox, subscribe here.

Founders and emerging tech investors need to exude extreme energy from the main character, as this Week in Tech was all about making their lives easier.

AngelList announced AngelList Stack, a new suite of products that will compete with Carta in providing services to help founders start, operate and retain ownership of their businesses. The new software will cover four bases: end-to-end incorporation, business banking, capital grants for advisors, and management of capitalization tables.

Here’s why AngelList isn’t worried about Carta, according to CEO Avlok Kohli:

There are a lot of experiences around point solutions, around solving different problems for different point problems for the founders. Our point of view is that the founders always prefer to be integrated into one package.

Entering the world of founding support was a surprising but sensible move for AngelList, according to my Twitter DMs. The startup has spent the last year growing its venture capital services business, having first piloted working capital, which allows LPs to support investors on a quarterly subscription model. Speaking of working capital, one of the first to launch was Sahil Lavingia, the founder and CEO of Gumroad. He had his own news with AngelList this week, although in the world of boy scouts or people looking for deals for venture capitalists.

Lavingia is launching a new pooled scout fund with AngelList in which each scout obtains a carry in their referred deal (5%) and an additional 5% in the entire pool of startups. In other words, he redirected 33% of his portage, or how much money the fund makes from portco exits, to his scouts.

The Scout Fund is unique because, while most funds can have Scout programs today, it is still very rare to share the carry with both Scouts from a group. and individual point of view.

He explained why this is important on a personal note: the paper trail.

I want to go a long way with this and build a very different kind of Scout coalition. If they can prove themselves and they get a print essay, I can help them connect to this ecosystem.

[Even with crypto] you see the financialization of all these relationships. Before, there’s a sort of informal, prepayment handshake that goes on in Silicon Valley, whereas with crypto it’s kind of like “I’m going to buy it this transactional way. by knowing what the real incentives are. I’m sending you this deal, but let’s be realistic here: this is a commercial transaction and I’m sending you this deal so I think it’s good to codify it.

I actually don’t mind not making money with Pinterest, but what’s frustrating sometimes is that an LP won’t appreciate the fact that I sent an investor to Pinterest. [when it was valued at $5 million].

As Lavingia suggests, a common thread between his efforts and those of AngelList is that they both want to formalize processes, whether it’s starting a business or introducing an investor to a business. It’s difficult to philosophically argue against more transparency and distribution in entrepreneurship, but it’s also difficult to achieve these goals in a way that actually helps those who need it most.

Think of it like this: AngelList wants it to be easier than ever to start a startup. But for whom? Lavingia thinks it is good that the scouts are paid, in full, for the companies they identify and thus develop a balance sheet. But what if the Boy Scouts are the same people who could possibly start a working capital if they wanted to? I’m always worried that new bets, whether it’s a company at full throttle or an investor sharing more of their carry, will want to reduce the risks of embedded volatility. Ultimately, democratizing access requires betting on people historically ignored, and that’s a risk the company clearly doesn’t take often.

This is why AngelList and Lavingia must be bold when building these new projects. Optionality (and affordability) is key when trying to usher in a new generation of innovators. But, they must ignore the status quo of who full stack has served in the past. Hell, they even need to remove a page from the crypto playbook.

In the rest of this newsletter, we’ll talk about the impact of frozen yogurt on consolidation, workplace benefits, and a return to blitzscaling. As always you can find me on Twitter @nmasc_ Where listen to me on Equity.

Benefits in the workplace, meet Alicia Keys

Image credits: Christopher Polk / NBC / Getty Images

As the pandemic continues, employees are either chasing a bigger goal or simply exhausted by the uncertainty and outdated culture of their current jobs. And mainstream edtech is taking note.

Here’s what you need to know: Outschool and MasterClass are quietly forming teams to sell their services to employers, instead of going directly to end users like in the good old days. Similar to other sectors, edtech wants to freshen up the way it sells to consumers, but will run into “point solution benefit fatigue” when it knocks on business doors.

Work Work Work:

Consolidation everywhere, always

Image credits: TheCrimsonMonkey / Getty Images

This week on Equity, we’ve gone from a conversation about full-stack approaches, like the ones above, to how consolidation seems to be everywhere these days. There are layers, or as the Equity team would like to say, flavors, to think about.

Here’s what you need to know: We used the fro-yo toppings to understand whether it makes sense for startups to be point solutions (give you the best of a flavor) or complete solutions (give you the medium option, but offer it all) . This mindset helps determine whether consolidation makes sense from a horizontal or vertical perspective. And the conversation started with an RPA space deal.

When M&A disappears:

Reid Hoffman wants to have a word

Reid hoffman

Image credits: Kelly Sullivan / Getty Images for LinkedIn

I’m still reflecting on a conversation I had with Reid Hoffman last week during TechCrunch Disrupt. The founder of LinkedIn joined us the same day Greylock, where he is an investment partner, announced a $ 500 million seed fund. So there was definitely a lot to say.

Here’s what you need to know: Even though Hoffman ironically adds to the ample market capital today, one of his strongest messages was to stay focused.

An excerpt from my play:

When LinkedIn co-founder and Greylock partner Reid Hoffman first coined the term “blitzscaling,” it was kept simple: It’s a concept that encourages entrepreneurs to prioritize speed over efficiency for a period of time. of uncertainty. Years later, the founders are going through a pandemic, perhaps the most uncertain time of their lives, and Hoffman has one clarification to make.

“Blitzscaling in itself is not the goal… blitzscaling is ineffective; it is inefficiently spending capital and inefficiently hiring; it’s being uncertain about your business model; and these are not good things. Instead, he said, blitzscaling is a choice companies may have to make for a set period of time to overtake a competitor or respond to a pandemic rather than a route to take the idea. at the IPO.

Around TC

I buried the lede here, but this week we announced that ExtraCrunch is changing its name to TechCrunch +! We’re doing this to get the most out of the TechCrunch brand, but also because we don’t think our parts – most of which help provide a signal in the midst of noise – are “extra”. Instead, as our team says, these are table stakes. Plus, it’s a super cute logo.

All week long

Seen on TechCrunch

Current and Former Employees Raise Major Safety Concerns and Sexual Harassment Allegations at Blue Origin

And that’s it, as the Zoom deal to buy Five9 is canceled

TikTok starts flirting with NFTs

Do you need another app to discover beautiful places when you travel?

Seen on TechCrunch +

Where and when to spend your recently collected dollars

Scaling Series A to C

Dear Sophie: Any advice on getting media coverage for my startup?

Startups have more options than ever to reduce their reliance on venture capital

Goodbye,

NOT



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